My plan was to work steadily, over time, on the literary magazine of sound – My Audio Universe – so as not to derail my daily writing discipline, and a day after publishing the Winter 2011 Edition, my plan earned a grade of B+.  Three months in production, my writing time was unmolested until last week when, as the deadline approached, I needed to spend more of the day mixing audio, yet I still worked for at least an hour each abbreviated writing day; so today I am feeling good about a new story, half written over the past two weeks titled Magnanimity and I am thrilled with the latest edition of My Audio Universe. The show features  the four best short stories I could find in the vast and growing landscape of electronic literary publishing, adapted to audio.  I ask anyone who visits here to have a listen.  We’re already at work on the Spring 2012 Edition due out on the Vernal Equinox.

And the “holiday” season has officially  become my least favorite time of year.  I am a student of radio before television.   To my knowledge I’ve listened to every episode of Have Gun Will Travel and Gunsmoke and scattered other shows.  These days I’m roughly half way through radio editions of Dragnet starring Jack Webb as sergeant Friday.  My wife and I just got back from the grocery store, and these are the weeks  when the insanity of low seasonal commercialism prompts a loss of hope, and recently, while listening to Dragnet, the following imbedded ads for Chesterfield cigarettes underscored my contempt for the well paid enemies of truth.  Since 1950, the date of these Chesterfield lies,  the work of ad agencies and PR flacks have become more deeply institutionalized and insidious; so I am more wary than ever  this “holiday” season … tv and commercial radio are mind poison … There is almost no commercial free public space … I cannot seem to hide from the glare …

Reading journal:  Moving from collection to collection and thoroughly enjoying the short stories of Ludmilla Petrushevskaya … Andre Dubus … Padraic Colum … Lydia Davis … Ken Kalfus with a fabulous story titled PU-239 … Tennessee Williams earliest short stories … Ry Cooter’s curious short stories … and The Knife Thrower by Steven Millhauser … Catch and Release by Thomas Lynch … F. Scott Fitzgerald’s early stories … and this morning, a careful reading of, The Love Song of A. Jerome Minkoff by Joseph Epstein … my wife surprised me with a collection of Roald Dahl short stories … looking forward …

Here is a photograph of the most recent addition to my collection of miniature aircraft … I dislike flying but am fascinated with aircraft.  This is the DeHavilland DH106 Comet, the world’s first commercial jet powered passenger plane.  The ground breaking design radically cut travel times but the planes began to disintegrate in flight after a certain number of hours in service, bodies scattered over the Mediterranean.  Come to find out, rivets that held the thin aluminum fuselage together were punched through the metal rather than drilled.  Micro cracks led to metal fatigue, which caused the planes to break apart in flight.  In the photo below, you can see a pair of black dots on top of the fuselage.  They are the radio windows where the air-frame would first break apart.  The Comet was taken out of service and re-manufactured, but too late.  The break in service allowed Boeing Commercial Airplanes time to launch its first jet liner, the 707.  DeHavilland eventually was sold off and went out of business.  Here is my DeHaviland DH 106 Comet: